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Metacity is not a meta-City as in an urban center, but rather
Meta-ness as in the state of being meta. i.e. metacity : meta as
opacity : opaque. Also it may have something to do with the Meta key
on UNIX keyboards.

The first release of Metacity is version 2.3. Metacity has no need for
your petty hangups about version numbers.

METACITY FEATURES
===

 - Boring window manager for the adult in you. Many window managers
   are like Marshmallow Froot Loops; Metacity is like Cheerios.

 - Uses GTK+ 2.0 for drawing window frames. This means colors, fonts, 
   etc. come from GTK+ theme.

 - There are 6 workspaces.

 - Global keybindings:
    Alt-F1 to Alt-F6  switch workspaces
    Alt-1  to Alt-6   switch workspaces
    Alt-Tab           forward cycle window focus
    Alt-Shift-Tab     backward cycle focus
    Alt-Escape        focus previous window

 - Window keybindings:
    Alt-space         window menu

    Mnemonics work in the menu. That is, Alt-space then underlined
    letter in the menu item works.

    Choose Move from menu, and arrow keys to move the window.

    While moving, hold down Control to move slower, and 
      Shift to snap to edges.

    Choose Resize from menu, and nothing happens yet, but 
      eventually I might implement something.   

 - Window mouse bindings:

    Clicking anywhere on frame with button 1 will raise/focus window
    
    If you click a window control, such as the close button, then the 
     control will activate on button release if you are still over it
     on release (as with most GUI toolkits)

    If you click and drag borders with button 1 it resizes the window
    
    If you click and drag the titlebar with button 1 it moves the 
     window.

    If you click anywhere on the frame with button 2 it moves the window,
     without raising it.

    If you click anywhere on the frame with button 3 it shows the 
     window menu.

    If you hold down Alt and click inside a window, it will move the 
     window (buttons 1 and 2) or show menu (button 3).

    If you pick up a window with button 1 and then switch desktops
     the window will come with you to the new desktop, this is 
     a feature copied from Enlightenment.

 - Session management:

    Metacity connects to the session manager and will set itself up 
     to be respawned.

 - Here is an example of how you can configure the Metacity 
   window border appearance in ~/.gtkrc-2.0:

       style "metacity-style"
       {
          font_name = "Sans 16"
          MetaFrames::title_border = { 7, 7, 7, 7 }
          MetaFrames::button_width = 25
          bg[NORMAL] = { 0.0, 0.0, 0.0 }
       }

       class "MetaFrames" style "metacity-style"

   You get the idea. It is just your basic GTK+ rc file, the 
   window borders are a widget called MetaFrames, 
   look in frames.c:meta_frames_class_init() for all the style
   properties that you can configure.

   Metacity-specific styles can also be included in any GTK+ 
   theme.

 - Metacity implements much of the new window manager spec from
   freedesktop.org, and much of the ICCCM. But then there are 
   parts of each that it doesn't implement, just because I haven't
   yet.

 - Uses Pango to render text, so has cool i18n capabilities. 
   Supports UTF-8 window titles and such.

METACITY BUGS, NON-FEATURES, AND CAVEATS
===

 - Metacity creates a big file in your home directory called
   ~/metacity.log with a bunch of debug spew.

 - If you want a number of workspaces which is not 6, you have to 
   edit screen.c and recompile.

 - If you want keybindings which are not the ones mentioned above
   as features, you have to edit keybindings.c and recompile.

 - Metacity does not have any way to unminimize a window. So 
   clicking the minimize button is sort of a bad idea.

 - Metacity uses the new window manager spec, but only random bits
   of the old GNOME spec. It correctly advertises exactly which 
   parts of the GNOME spec it supports, but it does not support 
   enough of it to make the GNOME task list and desk guide happy,
   and they do not support the new spec. I don't want anyone to 
   spend time sending me patches to support the old GNOME spec; 
   instead, send patches to the task list and desk guide to support
   the new spec. As far as I know, Metacity does support enough 
   of the new spec to allow a working tasklist and pager.

   Upshot: task list and desk guide DO NOT WORK with Metacity.

 - Metacity turns off its keybindings for Emacs, because I use 
   Alt-space in Emacs, and getting a window menu annoys me.
   
 - Cycling windows with Alt-Tab is flickery, AFAIK because
   Metacity passes the entire window stack to XRestackWindows() 
   every time you restack. Instead it should probably only restack 
   windows that have changed their stacking with respect to one 
   another.

 - Various operations, such as minimize, maximize, etc., should 
   have simple animations to make them clearer to users.

 - Metacity registers with the session manager, but doesn't actually 
   remember window sizes and positions. 

 - I haven't even read the ICCCM section about colormaps. So if you 
   have an 8-bit display you are basically screwed.

 - Metacity doesn't properly claim the window manager selection
   as described in the ICCCM. But then, most other window managers
   don't handle this correctly either.

 - I know there's at least one race condition involving rapidly 
   created and destroyed windows that will crash Metacity.

 - Window placement is always cascade for now; I want to implement 
   "first fit, falling back to cascade if no fit." 
   (Configurable placement algorithms are stupid though, don't 
   send me patches for any bogus ones.)

 - Maximization and movement constraints do not take the 
   GNOME panel into account. Most of the code already handles
   this (using workspace->workarea in workspace.h), but 
   workspace->workarea isn't ever actually calculated.
   Metacity needs to keep this area up-to-date using the hints the
   panel sets.

 - Should really support click-to-focus as an option.

 - Windows has a neat way of implementing Alt-Tab for 
   window cycling that I would like to copy. (The little 
   popup window thing.)

 - Should Metacity support flipping in right-to-left locales?
   I don't know what window managers look like in a right-to-left
   locale. I assume the window titles should be right-justified;
   should the window controls also be flipped?

COMPILING METACITY
===

You need GTK+ 1.3.x (to become 2.0). See configure.in for the exact
version you need. Metacity is a fairly trivial 6000-line C program, so
once you get GTK+ built it should be no problem to build Metacity.

REPORTING BUGS AND SUBMITTING PATCHES
===

Report new bugs to hp@redhat.com for now. Will switch to Bugzilla
sometime probably.

Feel free to send patches too; Metacity is really small and simple, so
if you find a bug or want to add a feature it should be pretty easy.

FAQ
===

Q: Will you add my feature?

A: If it makes sense to turn on unconditionally,
   or is genuinely a harmless preference that I would not 
   be embarrassed to put in a simple, uncluttered, user-friendly
   configuration dialog.

   If the only rationale for your feature is that other window
   managers have it, or that you are personally used to it, or something
   like that, then I will not be impressed. Metacity is firmly in the
   "choose good defaults" camp rather than the "offer 6 equally broken
   ways to do it, and let the user pick one" camp.

   This is part of a "no crackrock" policy, despite some exceptions
   I'm mildly embarrassed about. For example, multiple workspaces
   probably constitute crackrock, they confuse most users
   and really are not that useful if you have a decent tasklist and 
   so on. But I am too used to them to turn them off.
   Sloppy focus is probably crackrock too. Oh, and my Alt-1 thru Alt-6
   keybindings are definitely on crack.

   But don't think unlimited crack is OK just because I slipped up a
   little. No slippery slope here.   

   Don't let this discourage patches and fixes - I love those. ;-)
   Just be prepared to hear the above objections if your patch
   adds some crack-ridden configuration option.

Q: How do I add a configuration option?

A: You don't, until GConf 2 is relatively easy to compile and I feel 
   like adding it as a dependency.

Q: Will Metacity be part of GNOME?

A: If Metacity is ever better than the other options, and the GNOME
   Project so chooses. But Metacity may continue to suck forever 
   because I might get tired of working on it; or Metacity's feature
   set might not make sense for GNOME. Who knows. I'm not worrying
   about this, and you shouldn't either.

   For now Metacity is my toy hobby project that I work on when I feel
   like it.

Q: Why can't I move XMMS?

A: Because XMMS is broken and is trying to move itself. Metacity 
   does not tolerate insolent windows who believe they can
   self-manage. Use Alt-button1 to move XMMS using Metacity.

Q: Did you spend a lot of time on this?

A: Metacity is about 6000 lines of code, which took a few weekends and
   evenings to write. If it ever becomes more polished it will
   probably grow 2-3 more thousand lines of code and suck a few more
   weekends of time. If I started adding all kinds of features and 
   crack-ridden configuration options, it might take more time than that. 

Q: How can you claim that you are anti-crack, while still 
   writing a window manager?

A: I have no comment on that.