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authorElijah Newren <newren@gmail.com>2005-01-02 21:59:05 +0000
committerElijah Newren <newren@src.gnome.org>2005-01-02 21:59:05 +0000
commit9382d5810f04aee88a70474ee2050edfa1de24dd (patch)
tree4ca9221efd2ac1fa4b9015cacbe08e54a51931f5 /HACKING
parent890ffe18f218d930502eda27593db321d81acc52 (diff)
downloadmetacity-9382d5810f04aee88a70474ee2050edfa1de24dd.tar.gz
metacity-9382d5810f04aee88a70474ee2050edfa1de24dd.tar.bz2
Provide more documentation to make it easier for people to contribute to
2005-01-02 Elijah Newren <newren@gmail.com> Provide more documentation to make it easier for people to contribute to Metacity * HACKING: Add lots of information to extend this document: more on relevant standards and X properties, lots of information on debugging and testing, and add a list of some other important things to read; also move some information to src/code-overview.txt and organize this file into sections. * src/code-overview.txt: New file including some small parts from the old HACKING file and lots of new stuff. This file gives a brief overview of some of the bigger structures and files, with guides for a variety of task categories providing places to start looking in the code and things to look for.
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-Making a release
-===
-
-To make a release of metacity, do the following:
-
- - check out a fresh copy from CVS
-
- - increment the version number in configure.in,
- see the comment above the version for the next fibonacci number
-
- - update the file NEWS based on the ChangeLog
-
- - add a ChangeLog entry containing the version number
- you're releasing ("Released 2.5.4" or something)
- so people can see which changes were before and after
- a given release.
-
- - "make distcheck" (DO NOT just "make dist" - pass the check!)
-
- - if make distcheck fails, fix it.
-
- - once distcheck succeeds, "cvs commit"
-
- - if someone else made changes and the commit fails,
- you have to "cvs up" and run "make distcheck" again
-
- - once the commit succeeds, WITHOUT cvs updating, "cvs tag
- METACITY_X_Y_Z" where
- X_Y_Z map to version X.Y.Z
-
- - scp the tarball to master.gnome.org
-
- - run install-module on master.gnome.org to install the tarball
- on the ftp site
-
-Misc stuff
-===
-
-Don't commit substantive code in here without asking me,
-hp@redhat.com. Adding translations, no-brainer typo fixes, etc. is
-fine.
-
-The script src/run-metacity.sh is useful to hack on the window manager.
-It runs metacity in an Xnest. e.g.:
- CLIENTS=3 ./run-metacity.sh
-or
- DEBUG=memprof ./run-metacity.sh
-or
- DEBUG_TEST=1 ./run-metacity-sh
-or whatever.
-
-The tool metacity-message can be used as follows:
- metacity-message reload-theme
- metacity-message restart
- metacity-message enable-keybindings
- metacity-message disable-keybindings
-
-metacity-window-demo is good for trying behavior of various kinds of window
-without launching a full desktop.
-
-src/window.c is where all the guts of the window manager live. This is
-basically the only remotely scary file.
-
-src/frames.c is the GtkWidget that handles drawing window frames.
-
-src/core.h defines the interface used by the GTK portion of the window
-manager to talk to the other portions. There's some cruft in here
-that's unused, since nearly all window operations have moved out of
-this file so frameless apps can have window operations.
-
-src/ui.h defines the interface the plain Xlib portion of the window
-manager uses to talk to the GTK portion.
-
-Files that include gdk.h or gtk.h are not supposed to include
-display.h or window.h or other core files.
-
-Files in the core (display.[hc], window.[hc]) are not supposed to
-include gdk.h or gtk.h.
-
-src/theme.c and src/theme-parser.c have the theme system; this is
-well-modularized from the rest of the code, since the theme viewer app
-links to these files in addition to the WM itself.
-
-When hacking, remember that you can have multiple screens. The code is
-also written to support multiple displays, but this is useless, since
-you can just run two copies of the WM. Also, an XKillClient() or
-shutdown on any display causes Xlib to exit the app, so it would be
-broken. So the multi-display thing is mostly just for code
-cleanliness. Multi-screen on the other hand is important for some
-people.
-
-Remember that strings stored in X properties are not in UTF-8, and
-they have to end up in UTF-8 before we try putting them through Pango.
-
-If you make any X request involving a client window, you have to
-meta_error_trap_push() around the call; this is not necessary for
-X requests on the frame windows.
-
-Remember that not all windows have frames, and window->frame can
-be NULL.
-
-The code could use cleanup in a lot of places, feel free to do so.
-
-Metacity is ideally a fully ICCCM and EWMH-compliant window manager.
-Reading these specifications is a useful first step to understanding
-the role of a window manager on an X11 desktop and the standards and
-conventions on which X11 desktops are based. Please refer to the
-COMPLIANCE file for additional information on these specifications and
-metacity's compliance therewith.
+Intro...
+
+Window managers have a few ways in which they are significantly different
+from other applications. This file, combined with the code overview in
+doc/code-overview.txt, should hopefully provide a series of relatively
+quick pointers (hopefully only a few minutes each) to some of the places
+one can look to orient themselves and get started. Some of this will be
+general to window managers on X, much will be specific to Metacity, and
+there's probably some information that's common to programs in general but
+is nonetheless useful.
+
+Overview
+ Administrative issues
+ Relevant standards and X properties
+ Debugging and testing
+ Debugging logs
+ Adding information to the log
+ Valgrind
+ Testing Utilities
+ Technical gotchas to keep in mind
+ Other important reading
+ Extra reading
+ Ideas for tasks to work on
+
+
+Administrative issues
+ Don't commit substantive code in here without asking hp@redhat.com.
+ Adding translations, no-brainer typo fixes, etc. is fine.
+
+ The code could use cleanup in a lot of places, feel free to do so.
+
+ See http://developer.gnome.org/dotplan/for_maintainers.html for
+ information on how to make a release. The only difference from those
+ instructions is that the minor version number of a Metacity release
+ should always be a number from the Fibonacci sequence.
+
+Relevant standards and X properties
+ There are two documents that describe some basics about how window
+ managers should behave: the ICCCM (Inter-Client Communication Conventions
+ Manual) and EWMH (Extended Window Manager Hints). You can find these at
+ the following locations:
+ ICCCM - http://tronche.com/gui/x/icccm/
+ EWMH - :pserver:anoncvs@pdx.freedesktop.org:/cvs
+ The ICCCM is usually available in RPM or DEB format as well. There is
+ actually an online version of the EWMH, but it is almost always woefully
+ out of date. Just get it from cvs with these commands (the backslash
+ means include the stuff from the next line):
+ cvs -d :pserver:anoncvs@cvs.freedesktop.org:/cvs/icccm-extensions login
+ cvs -d :pserver:anoncvs@cvs.freedesktop.org:/cvs/icccm-extensions \
+ checkout wm-spec
+
+ DO NOT GO AND READ THOSE THINGS. THEY ARE REALLY, REALLY BORING.
+
+ If you do, you'll probably end up catching up on your sleep instead of
+ hacking on Metacity. ;-) Instead, just look at the table of contents and
+ glance at a page or two to get an idea of what's in there. Then only
+ refer to it if you see something weird in the code and you don't know
+ what it is but has some funny looking name like you see in one of those
+ two documents.
+
+ You can refer to the COMPLIANCE file for additional information on these
+ specifications and Metacity's compliance therewith.
+
+ One of the major things those documents cover that are useful to learn
+ about immediately are X properties. The right way to learn about those,
+ though, is through hand on experimentation with the xprop command (and
+ then look up things you find from xprop in those two manuals if you're
+ curious enough). First, try running
+ xprop
+ in a terminal and click on one of the windows on your screen. That gives
+ you the x properties for that window. Look through them and get a basic
+ idea of what's there for kicks. Next, try running
+ xprop -root
+ in a terminal. There's all the properties of the root window (which you
+ can think of as the "main" window). You can also manually specify
+ individual windows that you want the properties of with
+ xprop -id <id>
+ if you know the id of the window in question (you can get this from the
+ _NET_CLIENT_STACKING property of the root window). Finally, it can also
+ be useful to add "-spy" (without the quotes) to the xprop command to get
+ it to continually monitor that window and report any changes to you.
+
+Debugging information
+ Trying to run a window manager under a typical debugger, such as gdb,
+ unfortunately just doesn't work very well. So, we have to resort to
+ other methods.
+
+ Debugging logs
+
+ First, note that you can start a new version of metacity to replace the
+ existing one by running
+ metacity --replace
+ (which also comes in handy in the form "./src/metacity --replace" when
+ trying to quickly test a small change while hacking on metacity without
+ doing a full "make install", though I'm going off topic...) This will
+ allow you to see any warnings printed at the terminal. Sometimes it's
+ useful to have these directed to a logfile instead, which you can do by
+ running
+ METACITY_USE_LOGFILE=1 metacity --replace
+ The logfile it uses will be printed in the terminal. Sometimes, it's
+ useful to get more information than just warnings. You can set
+ METACITY_VERBOSE to do that, like so:
+ METACITY_VERBOSE=1 METACITY_USE_LOGFILE=1 metacity --replace
+ There are also other flags, such as METACITY_DEBUG, most of which I
+ haven't tried and don't know what they do. Go to the source code
+ directory and run
+ grep "METACITY_" * | grep getenv
+ to find out what the other ones are.
+
+ Adding information to the log
+
+ Since we can't single step with a debugger, we often have to fall back to
+ the primitive method of getting information we want to know: adding
+ "print" statements. Metacity has a fairly structured way to do this,
+ using the functions meta_warning, meta_topic, and meta_verbose. All
+ three have the same basic format as printf, except that meta_topic also
+ takes a leading enumeration parameter to specify the type of message
+ being shown (makes it easier for grepping in a verbose log). You'll find
+ tons of examples in the source code if you need them; just do a quick
+ grep or look in most any file. Note that meta_topic and meta_verbose
+ messages only appear if verbosity is turned on. I tend to frequently add
+ temporary meta_warning statements (or switch meta_topic or meta_verbose
+ ones to meta_warning ones) and then undo the changes once I've learned
+ the info that I needed.
+
+ There is also a meta_print_backtrace (which again is only active if
+ verbosity is turned on) that can also be useful if you want to learn how
+ a particular line of code gets called. And, of course, there's always
+ g_assert if you want to make sure some section isn't executed (or isn't
+ executed under certain conditions).
+
+ Valgrind
+
+ Valgrind is awesome for finding memory leaks or corruption and
+ uninitialized variables. But I also tend to use it in a non-traditional
+ way as a partial substitute for a normal debugger: it can provide me with
+ a stack trace of where metacity is crashing if I made a change that
+ caused it to do so, which is one of the major uses of debuggers. (And,
+ what makes it cooler than a debugger is that there will also often be
+ warnings pinpointing the cause of the crash from either some kind of
+ simple memory corruption or an uninitialized variable). Sometimes, when
+ I merely want to know what is calling a particular function I'll just
+ throw in an "int i; printf("%d\n", i);" just because valgrind will give
+ me a full stacktrace whenever it sees that uninitialized variable being
+ used (yes, I could use meta_print_backtrace, but that means I have to
+ turn verbosity on).
+
+ To run metacity under valgrind, use options typical for any Gnome
+ program, such as
+ valgrind --logfile=metacity.log --tool=memcheck --num-callers=48 \
+ --leak-check=yes --leak-resolution=high --show-reachable=yes \
+ ./src/metacity --replace
+ where, again, the backslashes mean to join all the stuff on the following
+ line with the previous one.
+
+ However, there is a downside. Things run a little bit slowly, and it
+ appears that you'll need about 1.5GB of ram, which unfortunately prevents
+ most people from trying this.
+
+ Testing Utilities
+
+ src/run-metacity.sh
+ The script src/run-metacity.sh is useful to hack on the window manager.
+ It runs metacity in an Xnest. e.g.:
+ CLIENTS=3 ./run-metacity.sh
+ or
+ DEBUG=memprof ./run-metacity.sh
+ or
+ DEBUG_TEST=1 ./run-metacity-sh
+ or whatever.
+
+ metacity-message
+ The tool metacity-message can be used as follows:
+ metacity-message reload-theme
+ metacity-message restart
+ metacity-message enable-keybindings
+ metacity-message disable-keybindings
+
+ metacity-window-demo
+ metacity-window-demo is good for trying behavior of various kinds
+ of window without launching a full desktop.
+
+Technical gotchas to keep in mind
+ Files that include gdk.h or gtk.h are not supposed to include display.h
+ or window.h or other core files.
+
+ Files in the core (display.[hc], window.[hc]) are not supposed to include
+ gdk.h or gtk.h.
+
+ Remember that strings stored in X properties are not in UTF-8, and they
+ have to end up in UTF-8 before we try putting them through Pango.
+
+ If you make any X request involving a client window, you have to
+ meta_error_trap_push() around the call; this is not necessary for X
+ requests on the frame windows.
+
+ Remember that not all windows have frames, and window->frame can be NULL.
+
+Other important reading & where to get started
+ Extra reading
+
+ There are some other important things to read to get oriented as well.
+ These are:
+ http://pobox.com/~hp/features.html
+ rationales.txt
+ doc/code-overview.txt
+
+ It pays to read http://pobox.com/~hp/features.html in order
+ to understand the philosophy of Metacity.
+
+ The rationales.txt file has two things: (1) a list of design choices with
+ links in the form of bugzilla bugs that discuss the issue, and (2) a list
+ outstanding bug categories, each of which is tracked by a particular
+ tracker bug in bugzilla from which you can find several closely related
+ bug reports.
+
+ doc/code-overview.txt provides a fairly good overview of the code,
+ including coverage of the function of the various files, the main
+ structures and their relationships, and places to start looking in the
+ code tailored to general categories of tasks.
+
+ Ideas for tasks to work on
+
+ There are a variety of things you could work on in the code. You may
+ have ideas of your own, but in case you don't, let me provide a list of
+ ideas you could choose from:
+
+ If you're ambitious, there's a list of things Havoc made that he'd really
+ like to see tackled, which you can find at
+ http://log.ometer.com/2004-05.html. Be sure to double check with someone
+ to make sure the item is still relevant if you're interested in one of
+ these. Another place to look for ideas, of course, is bugzilla. One can
+ just do queries and look for things that look fixable.
+
+ However, perhaps the best way of getting ideas of related tasks to work
+ on, is to look at the second half of the rationales.txt file, which tries
+ to group bugs by type.